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Proteo

Index: El Zahir, El Aleph, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 591. Ragnarök, El hacedor, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 803. Poema del cuarto elemento, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 869. Los enigmas, El otro, el mismo, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 916. A quien está leyéndome, El otro, el mismo, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 924. El alquimista, El otro, el mismo, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 925. Proteo, El oro de los tigres, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 1108. Otra versión de Proteo, El oro de los tigres, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 1109. Baldanders, El libro de los seres imaginarios, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 591. Daniel Ibarra: En nombre de la mar y sus sirenas, CS,El círculo secreto. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2003. 246. Yo, La rosa profunda, OP,Obra poética, 1923-1977. Madrid: Alianza, 1981. 421. Proteo, La rosa profunda, OP,Obra poética, 1923-1977. Madrid: Alianza, 1981. 443. Otra versión de Proteo, La rosa profunda, OP,Obra poética, 1923-1977. Madrid: Alianza, 1981. 444. Hilario Ascasubi (1807-1875), La moneda de hierro, OP,Obra poética, 1923-1977. Madrid: Alianza, 1981. 478. Herman Melville, La moneda de hierro, OP,Obra poética, 1923-1977. Madrid: Alianza, 1981. 485. Notas, La moneda de hierro, OP,Obra poética, 1923-1977. Madrid: Alianza, 1981. 508. Himno del mar, PJ,Poesía juvenil de Jorge Luis Borges. Barcelona: Olañeta, 1978. 58.
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Proteus, in classical mythology, prophetic old man of the sea who tended the seals of Poseidon and could change himself into any shape

Fishburn and Hughes: In Greek mythology a prophetic sea god, the son of Oceanus and Tethys, who had the power of assuming any shape he wished in order to avoid capture. The Zahir: Homer describes Proteus as living in a cave near the island of Pharos: 'He will seek to foil you by taking the shape of every creature that moves on earth, and of water and of portentous fire; but you must hold him unflinchingly and you must press the harder' (Odyssey 4.417-20). Because he could assume whatever shape he pleased, Proteus was regarded as typical of the ever-changing aspect of the sea and, in the Orphic tradition, as the original matter from which the world was created. The Theologians: 'protean' means having the ability to assume all kinds of appearances. The Immortal: when Ulysses and his men manage to capture Proteus, they are told by him that they must sail back to the waters of the Nile and make propitiatory sacrifices to the gods. At this point Proteus uses the name Egypt for the river Nile (Odyssey 4.355-8). The Inmortal; The Theologians; The Zahir