Skip to main content

Plutarco

Index: Una vida de Evaristo Carriego, Evaristo Carriego, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 113. El desafío, Evaristo Carriego, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 168. Los teólogos, El Aleph, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 550, 551, 555. Nuestro pobre individualismo, Otras inquisiciones, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 658. Nueva refutación del tiempo, Otras inquisiciones, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 771. El Centauro, El libro de los seres imaginarios, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 605. El Devorador de las Sombras, El libro de los seres imaginarios, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 615. El Doble, El libro de los seres imaginarios, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 616. La Quimera, El libro de los seres imaginarios, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 685. La Transmigración, Qué es el budismo, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 746. George Bernard Shaw, BP,Biblioteca personal. Madrid: Alianza, 1988. 72. Francisco de Quevedo, BP,Biblioteca personal. Madrid: Alianza, 1988. 74. Declaraciones sobre la Paz: Notas sobre la paz, BS,Borges en Sur 1931-1980. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1999. 33. La personalidad y el Buddha, BS,Borges en Sur 1931-1980. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1999. 37. Página sobre Shakespeare, BS,Borges en Sur 1931-1980. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1999. 70. Un dios abandona a Alejandría, Plutarco, CBE,Cuentos breves y extraordinarios. Buenos Aires: Losada, 1973. 57. La estatua, Plutarco, CBE,Cuentos breves y extraordinarios. Buenos Aires: Losada, 1973. 65. Charles y Mary Lamb: Cuentos basados en el teatro de Shakespeare, CS,El círculo secreto. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2003. 52. William Shakespeare: Teatro. Poesía, CS,El círculo secreto. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2003. 184. Museo,M,Museo. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2002. 48. William Shakespeare: Macbeth,P,Prólogos. Buenos Aires: Torres Agüero, 1975. 144. Diálogos del asceta y el rey, PB,Páginas de Jorge Luis Borges. Buenos Aires: Celtia, 1982. 194, 195. Página sobre Shakespeare, PB,Páginas de Jorge Luis Borges. Buenos Aires: Celtia, 1982. 226. Sobre los clásicos, PB,Páginas de Jorge Luis Borges. Buenos Aires: Celtia, 1982. 230. La cábala, SN,Siete noches. Mexico City: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1982. 125-26, 127. 29 de abril de 1938, Reseñas, Die Vorsokratiker, TC,Textos cautivos. Barcelona: Tusquets, 1986. 232. El propósito de Zarathustra, TR2,Textos recobrados 1930-1955. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2001. 212. Diálogos del asceta y del rey, TR2,Textos recobrados 1930-1955. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2001. 303. Montaigne, TR3,Textos recobrados 1956-1986. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2004. 37, 39.
Type
N

Plutarchos or Lucius Mestris Plutarchus, Greek essayist and biographer, c. 46-120, author of famous Parallel Lives of the Ancients

Fishburn and Hughes: A prolific Greek biographer from Chaeronea, in Boeotia, whose Parallel Lives of Greeks and Romans (of which 23 pairs and 4 single lives survive) and Moralia, a varied collection of ethical, religious, physical, political and literary studies, made him the most influential Greek writer in the Renaissance. CF 207 alludes to Plutarch's description of Caesar's reaction to the news that Pompey had been murdered on the orders of the King of Egypt: 'From the man who brought him Pompey's head he turned away with loathing as from an assassin; and on receiving Pompey's seal ring, he burst into tears' (Life of Pompey 8). CF 202: the dialogue On the Obsolescence of Oracles (Moralia 29) discusses the reasons why the advice and prophecies of the Greek gods were no longer to be heard in his day in the traditional places where oracles used to be consulted. Plutarch suggests that this is the result of Roman rule and the effect of the Romans' practical mentality on the Greeks' awareness of the metaphysical. The dialogue also discusses the possibility that more than one world exists. Plutarch, however, refutes the Stoic hypothesis that these worlds are supervised by several Zeuses, on the grounds that 'it is preposterous that there should be many supreme gods bearing one name' or 'an infinite number of suns, moons, Apollos, Artemises and Poseidons in the infinite cycle of worlds'. Gods, Plutarch continues, though born with the world and ending with it, are not tied to its physical nature like statues fixed to a pedestal; not participating in this nature, they are totally incorruptible and free from all limitations. The Theologians