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Jonson, Ben

Index: El inmortal, El Aleph, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 544. La flor de Coleridge, Otras inquisiciones, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 641. De alguien a nadie, Otras inquisiciones, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 738. Everything and nothing, El hacedor, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 803. El Teatro, Introducción a la literatura inglesa, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 817, 818. Silvina Ocampo: Enumeración de la Patria, BS,Borges en Sur 1931-1980. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1999. 258. Sir Thomas Browne, I,Inquisiciones. Buenos Aires: Editorial Proa, 1925. 32. Acotaciones (Maples Arce – Ramón – Omar Jayám y Fitz Gerald), I,Inquisiciones. Buenos Aires: Editorial Proa, 1925. 125. Alfonso Reyes: Reloj de sol, IA,El idioma de los argentinos. Buenos Aires: M. Gleizer, 1928. 127. Los expatriados, ILN,Introducción a la literatura norteamericana. Buenos Aires: Editorial Columba, 1967. 42. Notas, La moneda de hierro, OP,Obra poética, 1923-1977. Madrid: Alianza, 1981. 508. Pedro Henríquez Ureña: Obra crítica,P,Prólogos. Buenos Aires: Torres Agüero, 1975. 86. William Shakespeare: Macbeth,P,Prólogos. Buenos Aires: Torres Agüero, 1975. 143, 144. La pampa y el suburbio son dioses, TE,El tamaño de mi esperanza. Buenos Aires: Editorial Proa, 1926. 24. La aventura y el orden, TE,El tamaño de mi esperanza. Buenos Aires: Editorial Proa, 1926. 74. El método de una enseñanza, TR3,Textos recobrados 1956-1986. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2004. 266.

English dramatist and poet, 1572-1637, author of Every Man in his Humour, The Poetaster, Sejanus and numerous other works

Fishburn and Hughes: An English dramatist, contemporary with Shakespeare, whose best-known plays were Every Man in his Humour (1601), Volpone (1606) and The Alchemist (1610). The assertion that Ben Jonson defined his contemporaries 'with bits of Seneca' is an allusion to Timber; or Discoveries made upon Men and Matter (1640), a posthumous collection of essays whose text is derived in part from Seneca the Elder, Pliny and Quintilian. Seneca's inspiration is to be observed particularly in essay 63 on poets, 69 on style, 70 on famous orators, and 72 on other writers, including Bacon. In 63, for example, referring to the undeserved applause bestowed on the poetry of John Taylor (1578-1653), Jonson comments sarcastically: 'Not that the better have left to write or speak better but that they that heare them judge worse', an echo of Seneca's 'non illi peius dicunt sed hi corruptius judicant' (Controversiae 3, praef.). Writing of Shakespeare and the claim that 'he never blotted a line', Jonson commented: 'Would he had blotted a thousand.' Shakespeare, he explains, flowed with such facility that at times 'he should have been stopped': 'sufflaminandus erat', an allusion to the emperor Augustus' remark about the orator Atevius (Seneca, Controversiae 4.7) The Inmortal