University of Pittsburgh

Finder's Guide

(3) | " (3) | 1 (2) | 2 (1) | 4 (2) | A (1119) | B (897) | C (1382) | D (640) | E (621) | F (493) | G (685) | H (761) | I (305) | J (287) | K (227) | L (765) | M (1074) | N (363) | O (323) | P (1015) | Q (89) | R (627) | S (1118) | T (692) | U (124) | V (446) | W (302) | X (4) | Y (70) | Z (85) | ¡ (2) | ¿ (2)
Fa Hien
Formas de una leyenda, Otras inquisiciones, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 741.

Faxian, Chinese Buddhist monk, fl. 399-414

Formas de una leyenda, Otras inquisiciones, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 741. Los Nagas, El libro de los seres imaginarios, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 671.

Wiseman historical novel, 1854

Homenaje a César Paladión, Crónicas de Bustos Domecq, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 304.

Jules Supervielle book of poems, 1938

Fables

T. F. Powys, 1929

15 de abril de 1938, Biografía Sintética, T. F. Powys, TC,Textos cautivos. Barcelona: Tusquets, 1986. 227.
Fables

Stevenson, 1896.

Fe, alguna fe y ninguna fe, R. L. Stevenson, CBE,Cuentos breves y extraordinarios. Buenos Aires: Losada, 1973. 107.
Fables in Song

Lytton book of fables, 1876

Robert Louis Stevenson, Fábulas, CS,El círculo secreto. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2003. 241.

Továrna na absolutno, Capek science fiction, 1922

24 de febrero de 1939, Biografía Sintética, TC,Textos cautivos. Barcelona: Tusquets, 1986. 301.

Góngora poem, 1613

Fabulas

Aesop's fables

En búsqueda del Absoluto, Crónicas de Bustos Domecq, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 312. 2 de diciembre de 1938, BH,Borges en El Hogar 1935-1958. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2000. 136. Robert Louis Stevenson: Fábulas, CS,El círculo secreto. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2003. 241-43. Edward Gibbon: Páginas de historia y de autobiografía,P,Prólogos. Buenos Aires: Torres Agüero, 1975. 68. Una versión de Borges (1973), PB,Páginas de Jorge Luis Borges. Buenos Aires: Celtia, 1982. 245.

Spencer, 1902

La Creación y P.H. Gosse, Otras inquisiciones, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 651.

Poe story

Work, 1936, attributed in the Antología de la literatura fantástica to Holloway Horn.

Excerpt from Antología de poetas líricos castellanos by Menéndez y Pelayo.

Las facultades de Villena, Menéndez y Pelayo, CBE,Cuentos breves y extraordinarios. Buenos Aires: Losada, 1973. 68.
Facundo

Civilizacion i barbarie: Vida de Juan Facundo Quiroga, Sarmiento study of Argentine geography, history and politics, 1845

La tentación, El oro de los tigres, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 1121. El libro, BO,Borges, oral. Buenos Aires: Emecé/Universidad de Belgrano, 1979. 20. Pablo Lameiro, CS,El círculo secreto. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2003. 44. Jorge Luis Borges selecciona la mejor de Paul Groussac, CS,El círculo secreto. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2003. 195. Franklin, Cooper y los historiadores, ILN,Introducción a la literatura norteamericana. Buenos Aires: Editorial Columba, 1967. 13. Prólogo, MA,El matrero. Buenos Aires: Barros Merino, 1969. vii. La tentación, El oro de los tigres, OP,Obra poética, 1923-1977. Madrid: Alianza, 1981. 401. Prólogo de prólogos,P,Prólogos. Buenos Aires: Torres Agüero, 1975. 8. El gaucho,P,Prólogos. Buenos Aires: Torres Agüero, 1975. 64. José Hernández: Martín Fierro,P,Prólogos. Buenos Aires: Torres Agüero, 1975. 91, 96. El matrero,P,Prólogos. Buenos Aires: Torres Agüero, 1975. 112. Domingo F. Sarmiento: Recuerdos de provincia,P,Prólogos. Buenos Aires: Torres Agüero, 1975. 130, 132, 133. Domingo F. Sarmiento: Facundo,P,Prólogos. Buenos Aires: Torres Agüero, 1975. 134-39. Eduardo Gutiérrez, escritor realista, PB,Páginas de Jorge Luis Borges. Buenos Aires: Celtia, 1982. 154. Sobre Don Segundo Sombra, PB,Páginas de Jorge Luis Borges. Buenos Aires: Celtia, 1982. 187. Sarmiento), PB,Páginas de Jorge Luis Borges. Buenos Aires: Celtia, 1982. 214. Prólogo, PG1,Poesía gauchesca (1). Mexico City: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1955. x. Tercera conferencia, TANGO, 83. 9 de abril de 1937, Ensayo, Eduardo Gutiérrez, escritor realista, TC,Textos cautivos. Barcelona: Tusquets, 1986. 118. La pampa y el suburbia son dioses, TE,El tamaño de mi esperanza. Buenos Aires: Editorial Proa, 1926. 24. La Tierra Cárdena, TE,El tamaño de mi esperanza. Buenos Aires: Editorial Proa, 1926. 33. Nota bibliográfica al ‘Júbilo y el miedo’ de Ipuche, TR1,Textos recobrados 1919-1929. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1997. 265. La pampa, TR1,Textos recobrados 1919-1929. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1997. 292. Un estudio biográfico y crítico sobre Sarmiento, TR1,Textos recobrados 1919-1929. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1997. 310. La inútil discusión entre Boedo y Florida, TR1,Textos recobrados 1919-1929. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1997. 367. Antología clásica de la literatura argentina, TR2,Textos recobrados 1930-1955. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2001. 166. La poesía gauchesca, TR3,Textos recobrados 1956-1986. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2004. 63. Sarmiento, TR3,Textos recobrados 1956-1986. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2004. 68, 70. El gaucho, TR3,Textos recobrados 1956-1986. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2004. 128. Alicia Jurado, TR3,Textos recobrados 1956-1986. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 2004. 219.
Fader, Fernando

Argentine painter, 1882-1935

Spenser long poem, 1589 and 1596

Fishburn and Hughes: "The foremost English epic poem of the Renaissance, written by Edmund Spenser (1552-1599) in heroic or 'Spenserian' stanzas (rhyming pattern: ababbcbcc). The poem is highly allegorical, in the tradition of Ariosto and Tasso, though based upon English legend. It is set in the land of Fairie (England) ruled by its queen Gloriana (Elizabeth) and tells of the adventures of six of her knights, each representing a different virtue. Spenser uses the example of the mythical world of romance to illustrate the political and ecclesiastical conflict between Protestant England and Catholic Spain. A serious ethical intention underlies the poem, the conceits of the knights' adventures exemplifying a moral quest in which the individual, faced by the mysteries of life, chooses the principal Christian virtues of valour, temperance, friendship, love, justice and courtesy.

The Approach to Al-Mu’tasim , CF 86: comparison between the mystical quest in 'The Approach to Almotasim' and The Faerie Queene is well-founded: it has been said that 'enjoyment of the poem's sensuous surface is itself to undergo an experience, an ascent in vision with the protagonist' (A. Kent Hieatt, Short Time’s Endless Monument, 1960).

The Aleph, CF 285: in book 3 (2. 19) the story is told of a mirror made by Merlin for King Ryence which gives him the power to see all. It is in the form of a glass orb, shaped like the world, and enables the viewer to look into the hearts of men and foresee the intentions of his enemies and the treachery of his friends." (69-70)

El acercamiento a Almotásim, Historia de la eternidad, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 418. El Aleph, El Aleph, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 627. Nathaniel Hawthorne, Otras inquisiciones, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 671. El Unicornio, El libro de los seres imaginarios, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 703.
Fafnir

dragon in the Volsunga Saga

Fishburn and Hughes: "In the Old Norse Volsungsaga mythology the giant who killed his father in order to take possession of a treasure of gold, transforming himself into a dragon. Fafnir in turn was killed by Sigurd. See Fáfnismál." (70)

Las kenningar, Historia de la eternidad, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 380. El Zahir, El Aleph, OC,Obras completas. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1974. 592. La Óctuple Serpiente, El libro de los seres imaginarios, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 675. La Volsunga Saga, Literatura escandinava, Literaturas germánicas medievales, OCC,Obras completas en colaboración. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1979. 966-68.
Fafnismal

early Norwegian poem, The Words of the Dragon, Fafnir

Fishburn and Hughes: "'The Lay of Fafnir', one of the Volsung sagas recounted in the Norse Eddas. Sigurd is persuaded by Regin, his guardian and Fafnir's brother, to slay the dragon Fafnir in order to steal his treasure of gold. He goes to Gnitaheidr to lie in wait for Fafnir, whose custom it is to go there in search of water. Fafnir arrives and, realising that he is about to be killed, prophesies his slayer's death: 'The glistening gold, and the glow-red hoard / the rings thy bane will be.' He warns Sigurd that Regin, who 'betrayed me, will betray thee too, / and will be the bane of us both'. Sigurd responds by killing Fafnir and cutting off Regin's head; he also eats Fafnir's heart and drinks the blood of both his victims. Yet the prophecy proves strangely true: Sigurd himself is killed, as are all who subsequently own the gold." (70)